Things began to rile up earlier this summer when HARD Events decided to ban a popular \’rave\’ accessory that has been taking over festival grounds everywhere.

Best known as kandi, these bracelets are composed of colored beads and charms along with the occasional letter beads that spell something out; usually the phrase has to do with \’Molly\’ or PLUR. Nearly a week after the fresh news about HARD came to surface, Diplo announced that his upcoming Mad Decent Block Party (MDBP) events will not be a realm for ravers to trade their homemade and sometimes sentimental bracelets.

MDBP has to be one of the most anticipated summer events each year as it showcases Dip\’s label heroes like Dillon Francis, Flosstradamus, Riff Raff, and Zeds Dead. It also hosts a number of other acts such as Flux Pavilion, A$AP Ferg, and even Outkast. A $40 ticket price setback is nothing for all the talent provided; besides, if anyone knew how to throw a wild block party, it\’d be the twerk pioneer himself.

So what\’s the problem here? Why is Diplo not digging the beads?

i don\’t got nothing but love 4 u and your kandi i just want to take steps to make sure everyone is there 100% for the music. not other stuff

— blondre 3000 (@diplo) August 7, 2014

 

At the end of the day, it\’s Dip\’s party and he\’s the rightful boss. MDBP isn\’t an ordinary festival or show; there aren\’t extravagant stages filled with beaming lights and fireworks. It\’s never been like that and hopefully never will be. Diplo is simply trying to keep the mainstream rave culture away from his hard work as an independent label owner.

\”I\’m not good at PLUR!\” – Diplo

Is there anything wrong with that? In my opinion, Dip made a pretty solid statement. Trust me, it\’s not hard to enjoy a music event without trading plastic beads with strangers. Plus, this may be a strategic security move; kandi can be used to discreetly hide small pills and substances. Here\’s what the boss of superpower Insomniac Events had to say about it:

 

 

\’Rave\’ gear has now been commercially manufactured by people trying to make a buck. Even kandi has become a distraction from the simple message of peace, love, unity, and respect. I\’ve met some negative people with their arms covered in kandi; show it rather than wear it.

What do you think? Would a ban on kandi bracelets affect you or do you think it would help people focus on the music rather than the raving image?

For the record, I don\’t hate on rave culture; I occasionally wear a kandi bracelet or two if a close friend made it for me. I just dislike seeing kandi being worn as a distracting outfit or violently chewed on, but that\’s just me.

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